Donald Trump makes veiled attack on Boeing following Ethiopian Airlines crash

Because the crash bore similarities to the crash of a Lion Air flight five months ago, a number of airlines and national aviation regulators have grounded the Boeing 737 Max model.
Donald Trump says planes are becoming too complex to fly
Donald Trump says planes are becoming too complex to fly

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US President Donald Trump launched an apparent attack on Boeing Tuesday following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302, resulting in the deaths of all passengers and crew.

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Because the crash bore similarities to the crash of a Lion Air flight five months ago, a number of airlines and national aviation regulators have grounded the Boeing 737 Max model.

On Twitter, Trump said that airliners were becoming too complicated and were now flown by MIT graduates rather than pilots.

“Airplanes are becoming far too complex to fly. Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT. I see it all the time in many products,” he tweeted.

“Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better. Split second decisions are needed, and the complexity creates danger. All of this for great cost yet very little gain,” he said.

“I don’t know about you, but I don’t want Albert Einstein to be my pilot. I want great flying professionals that are allowed to easily and quickly take control of a plane!”

The Tweet are the US president’s first comments on the crisis that has engulfed Boeing, the US’ biggest and most prestigious plane-maker, since the Ethiopian Airlines crash.

It will likely put further pressure on the FAA to make a decision regarding the airworthiness of the model, which has been called into question.

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Although the FAA has the most important position as the home-country regulator that certifies Boeing planes, decisions by other nations have a steamrolling effect that could force its hand.

This is complicated by the fact that the FAA currently doesn’t have a permanent administrator. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao, who’s responsible for the agency and whose views would probably be decisive, seems to be taking a wait-and-see approach.

President Donald Trump may now want her to take a more direct stand.

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