Strike closes Boeing production

At the beginning of September, nearly 27,000 of Boeing's electricians, mechanics, riveters and other personnel at the main Everett plant, in Washington state, went on strike after discussions between their union and the aircraft manufacturing giant over pay issues failed.
DOWNING TOOLS: Aircraft production halts at Boeing HQ.
DOWNING TOOLS: Aircraft production halts at Boeing HQ.

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At the beginning of September, nearly 27,000 of Boeing's electricians, mechanics, riveters and other personnel at the main Everett plant, in Washington state, went on strike after discussions between their union and the aircraft manufacturing giant over pay issues failed.

"Over the past two days, Boeing, the union and the federal mediator worked hard in pursuing good-faith explorations of options that could lead to an agreement," said Scott Carson, president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes. "Unfortunately the differences between the two sides were just too great to close."

The company reiterated that its operations would remain open but that it would not be able to assemble any aircraft during the strike, although it would provide spare parts to current customers.

According to analysts, the general consensus is that a strike lasting less than three months - which is seen as likely - should not harm the US economy to any degree, and also should not see any customer movement towards rival Airbus.

Both Airbus and Boeing already have a lengthy backlog of orders and neither would be able to produce aircraft for any new clients within a reasonable period of time.

A side effect of the strike is that Middle Eastern carriers, which are leading the world in terms of aircraft orders, are likely to face even greater delivery delays.

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