Hydrogen fuel cell device to be available by 2017

A device to cut fuel use by 10 to 15 per cent and reduce exhaust emissions of internal combustion engines will be targeted at trucks, ships and trains.
The device is scalable and can be fitted to the engine of a family car or freight truck, as well as a cruise ship or ultra-large container carrier.
The device is scalable and can be fitted to the engine of a family car or freight truck, as well as a cruise ship or ultra-large container carrier.

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A device to cut fuel use by 10 to 15 per cent and reduce exhaust emissions of internal combustion engines will be targeted at the mining and transport and logistics industries.

The system, which can be fitted to any internal combustion diesel or petrol engine, has been developed by Hydroflex in South Australia and will be made commercially available following final trials.

The device is scalable and can be fitted to the engine of a family car or freight truck, as well as a cruise ship or ultra-large container carrier.

Large engines such as generators on mining sites, long-haul trucks, ships and diesel trains are the initial focus of Hydroflex however as they represent the biggest opportunities in terms of fuel savings and emission reductions.

Chief technology officer and inventor at Hydroflex, Richard Connors has been working on the device for a decade.

He said unlike catalytic converters and diesel particulate filters that treated emissions “after the fact”, his device used hydrogen and oxygen to increase the amount of fuel burnt in the combustion process.

“Our hydrogen and oxygen is not a fuel, it is an accelerant that is consumed in the process and thereby because it moves the flame front faster it burns more of the fuel leading to more power and less pollution,” Connors said.

The device needs just 1.5-litres of tap water every 2,000-kilometres and will be commercially available by the end of the year.

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