Racial profiling disrupts airlines after Paris attacks

US airline industry has seen widespread disruption in the weeks following the Paris terror attacks due to racial prejudice.
US airline industry has seen widespread disruption in the weeks following the Paris terror attacks due to racial prejudice.
US airline industry has seen widespread disruption in the weeks following the Paris terror attacks due to racial prejudice.

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The US airline industry has seen widespread disruption in the week following the Paris terror attacks, largely due to passengers' unfounded fear of Muslims on-board.

In at least five incidents US domestic flights, or planes flying to or from the United States, have been delayed for Muslim passengers to be de-boarded, or diverted due to 'terrorist threats'.

The incidents come as anti-Muslim hysteria has spread across parts of the US, leading to a spate of physical attacks on Muslims in both the US and Canada.

A Turkish Airlines plane flying from New York to Istanbul was diverted to Canada last Sunday because of a bomb threat, but police said no explosives were found.

The plane, with 256 passengers and crew, landed at Halifax Stanfield International Airport early Sunday after being alerted to the bomb threat.

"The Turkish Airlines aircraft is scheduled to continue on to Istanbul later this morning. The investigation into the threat is ongoing," the Canadian police said on Twitter.

Authorities received the threat late Saturday at 22:50 (0250 GMT) after the plane had departed New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.

Also Sunday, Singapore Airlines announced there was a bomb threat to one of its flights which originated from San Francisco and landed safely at Singapore's Changi Airport

The airline, in a statement, did not provide any details of how the threat came to light or what action was taken to ensure the flight's safety. It said the matter had been referred to the authorities.

On Wednesday last week, Khalil and Ayad, who moved to the U.S. from Palestine 15 years ago, were waiting for a flight from Chicago back to their hometown of Philadelphia.

While waiting at the gate, a Southwest Airlines boarding agent told the pair they wouldn't be allowed to board as another passenger was afraid to fly with them after hearing them speaking Arabic to each other.

After being questioned extensively, the pair were allowed to board the delayed flight.

The day before on Tuesday, November 17th, a Spirit Airlines Flight 969 was about to leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport on its way to Chicago when four passengers of "Middle Eastern descent," according to ABC7, were asked to leave the plane.

Fellow passenger Jenna Farella told CBS Baltimore that it was the "scariest moment of her life" when she realised that "Muslims" were flying on the same plane.

Farella alluded to some undescribed "suspicious activity" by the handful of fellow passengers."I've been through some scary times. This was the worst. I have never prayed so hard in my life," she said, adding that she quickly notified the airline staff, who stopped the plane and had the 'Middle Eastern' passengers taken off.

On Sunday last week, American Airlines Flight 2124 from Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport to Boston was delayed when two "suspicious" people, whom conservative commentator Laura Ingraham excitedly described as "two Middle Eastern passengers!" on Twitter, were removed from the flight.

The flight attendants thought the two 'Middle Eastern' passengers were suspicious and notified authorities, who questioned them at length before releasing both men.

A K-9 unit that swept the flight detected no threats and American Airlines said they were allowed to board another flight later that day.

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