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ICTSI makes crane order for Iraq container terminal

(ICTSI) in Iraq has ordered two ship-to-shore (STS) cranes and three rubber-tyred gantry (RTG) cranes for Umm Qasr Port.
(ICTSI) in Iraq has ordered two ship-to-shore (STS) cranes and three rubber-tyred gantry (RTG) cranes for Umm Qasr Port.
(ICTSI) in Iraq has ordered two ship-to-shore (STS) cranes and three rubber-tyred gantry (RTG) cranes for Umm Qasr Port.

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International Container Terminal Services, Inc. (ICTSI) in Iraq has ordered two ship-to-shore (STS) cranes and three rubber-tyred gantry (RTG) cranes from Terex Port Solutions (TPS).

The new cranes, which are being manufactured in Xiamen, China, will be delivered to Basra Gateway Terminal at the Port of Umm Qasr, Iraq, in the second quarter of 2016 as part of the port’s development and expansion plan.

The container terminal is operated by ICTSI.

The two all-electric STS cranes, which are used predominantly for loading and unloading containers on feeder vessels, are fitted with a self-propelled trolley and have a lifting capacity of up to 41 tonnes under spreader.

The machines have a hoisting height of 32m above the quayside and 18m below and are designed for an outreach of 42m.

The three RTGs are used for managing the container stackyard and offer a maximum lifting capacity of 41 tonnes under spreader and can stack one-over-five standard containers with a hoisting height of 18.1m.

With a span of 23.5m, the RTG cranes are able to cover six rows of containers and a lane for terminal or road trucks.

Maurizio Altieri, general manager of the TPS facility in Xiamen, said that the new cranes would contribute to the competitiveness of the Iraqi container terminal.

In April 2014, Philippines-based ICTSI signed a contract with the General Company for Ports of Iraq to operate, develop, and expand the container facilities at the Port of Umm Qasr.

ICTSI will manage and operate the port’s existing terminal at berth 20 under a 10-year concession, as well as build a new container terminal under a 26-year concession agreement.

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